Victory of the Daleks

Right, format breaker time, because this is a very strange episode indeed. It contains the best stuff Gatiss has ever written for the show, the two leads remain on stunning form and there are a couple of outstanding guest performances. But there’s one big problem.

OH MY GOD THE NEW DALEKS ARE TERRIBLE.

For starters, they’re simply too big and bulky. It changes their basic shape too much, and for some reason I find them a lot more menacing when they’re not towering over everyone – they were hardly diminutive before, but the point is they’re so dangerous that they don’t need to be quite so imposing. They’ve got fat shoulders, big arses and stupid long necks, which makes their heads look too small in proportion. I can take or leave the bright and varied colours, but that’s about as close as I can get to a compliment. The voice is all wrong too. It’s just not quite a Dalek, like it’s a slightly shoddily made knock-off.

I am a lot less angry now than I was seven years ago, considering they’ve been quietly shelved in favour of the proper ones since, but I’m still baffled by the decision to change them in the first place. It’s one of the single most iconic designs in television history; even if the new design was brilliant, it would be hard for people to accept the change. But it’s not brilliant. Having a new batch of Daleks out there who aren’t in any way connected to RTD’s Time War makes sense from a story perspective. Redesigning them only makes sense from a toy-selling perspective.

So I wanted to get all of that out the way, because rewatching this story has made me realise it’s such a shame that the New Paradigm bastards completely overshadow the rest of the episode. Everything was going so well up until the big reveal, and it’s only now that I’ve calmed down enough to appreciate all that came before and after it. So let’s ignore the elephant-sized Daleks in the room, expunge that part of the episode from the record and start again…

Victory of the Daleks

* Why are half the people in the Cabinet War Rooms cosplaying as Captain Jack? This is World War II, not a Torchwood convention.

* Bill Paterson! A man who, thanks to a childhood obsession with Roald Dahl adaptations, I will forever associate with cock-a-leekie soup. Now there’s a guest actor who’s playing a part worthy of his status. While I’m still not sure how I feel about the notion that you can persuade a bomb not to go off by telling it that it’s human, he’s one of those actors who’s so captivating that you’re willing to go along with it.

* There is one Dalek redesign that I am on board with: what I like to call the Dad’s Army Dalek, complete with black out curtains over the lights. It’s rare that the Daleks are played for laughs, but in the right circumstances it can work. There are obvious echoes of Power of the Daleks, so much so that I kept on expecting them to say “we are your servants” instead of “we are you soldiers”. However, there are few Dalek moments in history so amusing as one responding to being hit on the head with a spanner by asking “you do not require tea?”.

* So Amy doesn’t recognise the Daleks, and therefore doesn’t remember their recent invasions. The inconsistency as to how people have responded to these events is something I’ve been complaining about for a while, so I suppose this works as a retrospective fix. Basically Moffat can use the crack in time to undo any bits of continuity hanging over from Russell’s era, thus giving him a blank canvas.

* I love the fact that The Doctor and Winston Churchill are old friends, and that we just accept this. The character is of course a rather romanticised version of the real person, but then you wouldn’t expect them to explore the whole anti-Semitism thing of a Saturday teatime. The “Keep Buggering On” persona is certainly in keeping with what the real Churchill represents, culturally speaking, and it’s a fine performance from Ian McNeice, a good balance between characterisation and impersonation.

* There’s a character that we see a handful of times throughout the episode – a woman serving in the War Rooms, whose boyfriend/husband is an RAF pilot, and we learn towards the end that he’s been shot down and killed. It’s clearly there to illustrate the horrors of war, but it’s so weird that neither The Doctor or Amy interact with her at all. You’d expect her and Amy to get chatting at some point, so that her story is fleshed out and we care more about her later loss, but no – we don’t get to know her at all, so her fella is just another statistic instead of a human story.

RATING: 7

Advertisements

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s